The more you think, the more you think things up…

I don’t know why, this morning over breakfast, it occurred to me… oh yes I do, the news was on, and they were discussing a recent interview with Pope Francis where, when asked who he was (the man, not the pope) he answered “I am a sinner.”  Which had me thinking about his role, and the Vatican’s, as theologically perfect, even when less than perfect.  I was impressed that his foremost thought was his own imperfection, which means trouble for the papal perfectionists.  But I thought it can only be a good thing, that the shepherd was humbly aware of his own failings, meaning he is equally aware of our own.  I also thought of the irony that the man charged with safeguarding religious dogma — the spiritual policeman, as it stands — is also a spiritual felon (his admission, not my accusation).  Which then led me to wonder how policemen/women (policepeople?) actually do their job.  They drive fast, roll through stop signs, and commit who knows how many other petty crimes when out of uniform, yet when they’re on duty they sit in judgement of the rest of us like priests.  They have the power to condemn or condone, bless or arrest, chastise or forgive… in many ways, the law *is* the national religion, and law enforcement officers are the priests.  Yet we have no law enforcement pope, unless you call the director of Homeland Security the Policeman’s Pope, and that just isn’t it, not yet.  But what if it was?  What if the law became a national religion? What are lawyers and judges?  How do the two parallel, the Catholic Church and the American Law Enforcement system?  I wonder if someone else has done this already…

There’s a Police Chief who’s also a priest in the Philippines

http://www.cops.ph/cops-search/251-priest-is-among-countrys-outstanding-policemen-of-the-year-

while far and away the search results showed the police pitted against the priests one way or another… like opposing religions.  I may be on to something here.